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#13487393 Oct 17, 2017 at 05:21 PM
980 Posts
Hey Gnomes!

I've got a minor situation that I want YOUR help with! As some of you know I am working on getting my teacher license this year and to do that I have a lot of fun assignments as well as some solo teaching! Next spring I will be doing my unit of solo teaching and something that I am currently designing for that is for an 8th grade social studies class. The Unit will be on the Civil War. My question for help is I am playing on swinging for the fences and since I have the ability to screw up on it I decided to Gamify the 3-4 week Unit. For those of you who are not familiar with the theory of gamification it is
"not quite creating a game but transferring some of the positive characteristics of a game to something that is not a game... Those positive characteristics of a game are often loosely described as fun and they have the effect of engagting game players in the activity. The fun in game play is engineered by the four building blocks or characteristics, of a game: goal, rules, feedback system, and voluntary participation. in gamification these building blocks more or less still appear but in a less pronounced manner." (Kim, Bohyun. "Understanding Gamification" Library Technology Reports 51.2 Feb/March 2105).

Basically its people learn best through playing. So you take the things that "hook" you into to something and encourage you to keep doing it and you learn the topic as you go. Right now I have a few things that I am planning to add, (like levels and rewards when X% of class reaches X level, "item drops" for certain scores that allow certain things like dropping a question on a 'quest of knowledge' aka the test.) What I want form you excellent gnomes is suggestions of things you have seen in games that have hooked you into the activity. Or suggestions on what to add!

Thanks!
Coggs/Durell/Whit
"What is this world twisted?" ~LVG
+1
#13487505 Oct 17, 2017 at 08:13 PM
1 Post
Letting people know how close they are to the next letter grade through experience points sounds fun!
+1
#13487720 Oct 18, 2017 at 01:05 AM
Commanding O...
2103 Posts
I will have to give this some careful thought. I notice that you are not asking for help on the subject matter in question but rather more on the game design aspect itself.

One of the key aspects of gameplay that makes it so addictive is the cycle of Playing and getting Rewards. Now rewards as you know can take many forms. Most designers tailor the type and scale of the rewards to the amount of time and/or skill the player invests in the game. Blizzard for example excels at this type of design.

If you need feedback on types of rewards to offer the players of your game, I would need to know a little more about its nature. Is it a wargame (i.e. will you split the class into North & South factions and pit them against each other)? Is it a learning competition where students compete to pass quizzes, or come up with questions & answers from the curriculum that will stump their competitors? Will you put students "in charge" of the various states and their resources in a "What If" scenario where you deal them historic based challenges over the course of the game in an effort to get them to better appreciate the tough decisions their predecessors had to make in their day?

Single player? Multi-Player? If youre designing your first game I would urge you to keep it fairly simple and straight forward. Easy to understand rules. Play through the game yourself several times to check for "bugs" and "exploits" (kids have a LOT of experience with games, so dont underestimate them). Hold play tests with other faculty in advance to get feedback on your methods.

Good luck and have fun! =)

- Forbs
"For Gnomeregan!"

+2
#13487955 Oct 18, 2017 at 05:12 AM
29 Posts
Will there be voice acting involved?😊
+1
#13500898 Oct 27, 2017 at 09:31 AM · Edited 10 months ago
980 Posts
#13487720 Forbs wrote:

I will have to give this some careful thought. I notice that you are not asking for help on the subject matter in question but rather more on the game design aspect itself.

One of the key aspects of gameplay that makes it so addictive is the cycle of Playing and getting Rewards. Now rewards as you know can take many forms. Most designers tailor the type and scale of the rewards to the amount of time and/or skill the player invests in the game. Blizzard for example excels at this type of design.

If you need feedback on types of rewards to offer the players of your game, I would need to know a little more about its nature. Is it a wargame (i.e. will you split the class into North & South factions and pit them against each other)? Is it a learning competition where students compete to pass quizzes, or come up with questions & answers from the curriculum that will stump their competitors? Will you put students "in charge" of the various states and their resources in a "What If" scenario where you deal them historic based challenges over the course of the game in an effort to get them to better appreciate the tough decisions their predecessors had to make in their day?

Single player? Multi-Player? If youre designing your first game I would urge you to keep it fairly simple and straight forward. Easy to understand rules. Play through the game yourself several times to check for "bugs" and "exploits" (kids have a LOT of experience with games, so dont underestimate them). Hold play tests with other faculty in advance to get feedback on your methods.

Good luck and have fun! =)

- Forbs
"For Gnomeregan!"



Its less of designing a game to play and more of taking principles in games and applying positive elements into the day to day running of the bigger unit. For example one thing I am planning on putting into my unit is a scaled down/more simple version of......





For every assignment/grade they will gain XP they can spend the XP on "talents". One tree will be positive for the Class as a whole (first lvl and 95% class purchase = use of headphones/music during individual work). Another Tree will help your "state/side" since they will research and decide as a group which if they want to go North or South. The final tree is all about solo stuff (maybe a "stun" to get away from one difficult question on a quiz/test) or ca Hero type of spell where they get a curve on an assignment of their choice.

Ultimately the goal is to make learning fun/less anxiety for the students.



Edit: Forgot to add.... Yep it'll be more simplistic. My goal is to try this format out. Most teachers I've seen do this have done it either for a full quarter or an entire semester. I'm going 3 maybe 4 weeks. It is more for me personally so that I have an idea of how it works/what I will need to change so that when I have taught at a place for 3 years and have seniority I can try and work it in depending on the admin. :) I've got three professors who are all cool with me trying this out as long as I include the required elements. The third one got really excited and spent 10 minutes after class yesterday when I casually mentioned it too her going through a bit of a content dump on me since she's an online gamer and likes the theory. :)

Nope no real voice acting unless we do a video project.
"What is this world twisted?" ~LVG
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